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How Seniors Can Tame Pet Care Costs

How Seniors Can Tame Pet Care CostsDear Savvy Senior,
What tips can you recommend to help senior pet owners with their veterinary bills? I have two cats and a dog that are family to me, but their vet bills have become unaffordable.

--Fix Income Frankie


Dear Frankie,
The high cost of veterinary care has become a problem for millions of pet owners today, but it can be especially difficult for seniors living on a fixed income. Routine medical care can cost hundreds of dollars, while urgent/specialized treatments and procedures can run into the thousands. But, it is possible to reduce your pet care costs without sacrificing their health. Here are some tips that can help you save.

Shop around:
If youíre not attached to a particular veterinarian, call some different vet clinics in your area and compare costs. When you call, get price quotes on basic services like annual exams and vaccinations, as well as bigger-ticket items, like to repair a broken leg, so you can compare. Also, check to see if you live near a veterinary medical school (see aavmc.org for a listing). Many schools provide low-cost care provided by students who are overseen by their professors.

Ask your vet for help: To help make your vet bills more manageable, see if your vetís office accepts monthly payments so you donít have to pay the entire cost up front. Also, find out if your vet offers discounts to senior citizens or reduces fees for annual checkups if you bring in multiple pets.


Search for low-cost care: Many municipal and nonprofit animal shelters offer free or low-cost spaying and neutering programs and vaccinations, and some work with local vets who are willing to provide care at reduced prices for low-income and senior pet owners. Call your local shelter or humane society to find out whatís available in your area.

Look for financial assistance: There are a number of state and national organizations that provide financial assistance to pet owners in need. To locate these programs, the U.S. Humane Society provides a listing on their website that you can access at humanesociety.org/petfinancialaid.

Buy cheaper medicine: Medicine purchased at the vetís office is usually much more expensive than you can get from a regular pharmacy or online. Instead, get a prescription from your vet (ask for generic is possible) so you can shop for the best price.


Most pharmacies such as Walgreens, CVS, Walmart, Kmart, Rite Aid and Target fill prescriptions for pets inexpensively, so long as that same drug is also prescribed to humans. And, many pharmacies offer pet discount savings programs too.

You can also save by shopping online at one of the Veterinary-Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites accredited by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, like 1-800-PetMeds (1800petmeds.com), Drs. Foster & Smith (drsfostersmith.com), KV Supply (kvsupply.com), and PetCareRx (petcarerx.com).

Consider pet insurance:
If you can afford it, pet insurance is another option worth looking into. You can get a basic policy for under $10 per month, and some insurers provide discounts for insuring multiple pets. See petinsurancereview.com to compare policies. Membership discount plans like Pet Assure (petassure.com) are another way to save, but youíll need to use a vet in their network.

Look for other ways to save: In addition to cutting your veterinary bills, you can also save on pet food and other supplies depending on where you shop. Target, Walmart, Costco and the dollar stores typically offer much lower prices than supermarkets and specialty retailers like Petco and PetSmart. You can also save on treats and toys at sites like coupaw.com and doggyloot.com.

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